ICONEA SEMINARS

Wednesday 23 October 2013
Time Title
17:00 Pitch, Pi, and Other Musical Paradoxes, or MusicAsEasyAsPi 
ICONEA Seminar Near and Middle Eastern archeomusicology. Free of charge and open to the public
Charles Lucy

Abstract:

Charles Lucy describes how he rediscovered the musical tuning theories of John ‘Longitude’ Harrison derived from the mathematical constant pi, and developed them into a new system of tuning and harmony called LucyTuning

His presentation will include slides and musical examples of how this very specific meantone tuning, can emulate any musical tuning system, and modulate, or transpose, infinitely.

LucyTuning has been extremely controversial in the ongoing “Tuning Wars”, as it presumes that musical “harmonics” are not restricted to the Just Intonation intervals traditionally calculated from small integer frequency ratios. e.g. 3/2, 4/3, 6/5, 7/5, 8/5, etc.

This system includes a method of scalecoding, which can describe and sort a myriad of musical intervals and scales to arrange them in levels of consonance and dissonance.

One LucyTuned table for microtuning may now be found in the Apple application Logic Pro 9, and about fifty more can be downloaded from:

http://www.lucytune.com,

where more information on LucyTuning is also freely available.

Click on this link for photographs of the seminarNew Link

Wednesday 13 November 2013
Time Title
17:00 Ajnas,’uqud and the traditional maqam form in Iraq 
ICONEA Seminar Near and Middle Eastern archeomusicology. Free of charge and open to the public
Ahmed Mukhtar

 

 PAST SEMINARS:

 

Next Seminar: 27 February 2013, 17:00 – 18:30

Modality in Question

Speaker: Richard Dumbrill

Venue: Room G21a (Ground Floor)

Venue Details: South Block, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

Free of charge. Open to the public. No advance booking required.

Autumn term 2012

Saturday 16  September 2012, Room 102

Lacan Reading Group

Seminar 7: The Ethics of Psychoanalysis: What does psychoanalysis allow us to formulate concerning the origin of morality.

The idea for the Lacan Reading Group stems from an initial collaboration between Richard Dumbrill (Director of ICONEA), Julia Evans (Lacanian Analyst and a member of the Eurofederation of Psychoanalysis), and Bruno de Florence (Musicologist and Fellow of ICONEA). We are grateful for the support given by both ICONEA and the Institute of Musical Research.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 3 October 2012, 17:00 – 18:30

Modality in Question

Speaker: Richard Dumbrill

Venue: Room G21a (Ground Floor)

Venue Details: South Block, Senate House  Malet Street London WC1E 7HU

Open to the public, free of charge; no booking required

 

Thursday 11 October 2012, 17:00 – 18:30

The reconstruction of an Elamite harp from the Battle of Ulai at the British Museum

Speakers: Margaux Bousquet (Sorbonne University Pantheon)

and Richard Dumbrill

Venue: Room 261 (Senate House, second floor)

Senate House University of London London WC1E 7HU

Open to the public, free of charge; no booking required

 

Margaux Bousquet demonstrating the playing of the harp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Dumbrill

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 24 October 2012, 17:00 – 18:30

Commentary on Richard Dumbrill’s Modality in Question

Speaker: Bruno de Florence

Open to the public, free of charge; no booking required

 

Winter Term 2013 Wednesday 30 January 2013, 17:00 – 18:30

The spiritual nature of Pythagorean music philosophy in Anatolian Sufi practice.

Speaker: Alan Prosser

 

Venue:

Senate House University of London London WC1E 7HU

Open to the public, free of charge; no booking required

Wednesday 27 February 2013, 17:00 – 18:30

Modality in Question

Speaker: Richard Dumbrill

Venue: Room (To be defined)

Venue Details: (To be defined)

Open to the public, free of charge; no booking required

 

Wednesday 13 March 2013, 17:00 – 18:30

Oral Tradition and its Texts: Hamparsum Notation in 19th Century Istanbul

Speaker: Jacob Olley, King’s College London

The 19th century was a period of extensive social and political change in the Ottoman Empire, which also saw new developments in literature and the performing arts. It was during this time that, through the initiative of Armenian church musicians, a new notation system (Hamparsum notası) was introduced into Ottoman art music. The collections of pieces which survive in this musical script illustrate the processes of change and diversification which occurred within a largely oral tradition.

This seminar aims to provide an overview of Hamparsum notation and its place in Ottoman musical and cultural history.

Hamparsum notation

Open to the public, free of charge; no booking required

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 10 April 2013, 17:00 – 18:30

***REPLACING BRUNO de FLORENCE’S MODALITY PRESENTATION***

HOWARD GOODALL’s STORY OF MUSIC': a critical examination

Venue: Room (To be defined)

Venue Details: (To be defined)

Open to the public, free of charge; no booking required

Click here for more details

Wednesday 15 May 2013, 17:00 – 18:30

THE BABYLONIAN ROOT TWO METHOD

Speaker: Pete Blumson AKA Pete Dello

The American Musicologist Prof. Ernest McClain spent most of his life studying the harmonics of the Ancient World. The cornerstone of his method is a musical matrix similar to the Lambda of  Plato’s Timaeus. Plato based his matrix upon the primes 2 and 3. McClain, by discovering an ingenious method of incorporating the prime 5 into his own matrix has harmonised it with the ‘regular’ numbers of the sexagesimal system first used by the Sumerians and the Babylonians for astronomical purposes. McClain has shown that his method draws together music, astronomy and geometry in an extremely innovative and potent way. His hypothesis is that the Babylonian cribes would have ‘played’ with something similar to this while pursuing their own investigations.  

This seminar will reveal some of the properties of inverse symmetry contained in McClain’s Matrix and how they can be used to deduce not only the square root of two (by the method hinted at by Neugebauer and Sachs but also square root of other primes which can be worked out in easy steps using this ‘musical algorithm’, Unlike rival methods which often steeped in algebra this method is extremely intuitive. 

Venue: Room (To be defined)

Venue Details: (To be defined)

Open to the public, free of charge; no booking required

Click here for more details

Wednesday 12 June 2013, 17:00 – 18:30

SHOFAR, TOTEMISM AND VOICE: A FREUDIAN-LACANIAN APPROACH >From a remark by Jacques Lacan on a text by Theodor Reik, I shall attempt to outline how we can consider musical practices as incarnated thinking. Borrowing from the notions of perception (Merleau-Ponty), jouissance (Lacan) and libido (Freud), I shall propose a model of musical performance and its listening as a continuous path along a multidimensional Moebius strip, structured by the enigma of the real of the body.

Speaker: Bruno de Florence

Venue: Room (To be defined)

Venue Details: (To be defined)

Open to the public, free of charge; no booking required

Click here for more details

Past seminars

Spring term 2011

Wednesday 1 February 2011. (Stewart House, Room ST276), 5 – 6 30pm)

Bruno de Florence: Between Freudian libido and Lacanian jouissance: the X Factor of emotion in Musicology, and its sublime object a.

Wednesday 29 February 2011. (Stewart House, Room ST276, 5 – 6.30pm)

Richard Dumbrill/Bruno de Florence: The Pythagorean conspiracy and the contingency of arithmetics and geometrics in the theory of music.

 Wednesday 28 March (Stewart House, Room ST276, 5 – 6.30pm)

Leon Crickmore: Exploring the Musical Tetractys. 

Autumn Term 2011

Seminars

Wednesday 12 October (Senate House, Room 103), 5 – 6 30pm

Bruno de Florence, Between Truth and Knowledge:

The Lacanian Contribution to Musicology

 

Wednesday 16 November (Senate House, Room 104), 5 – 6.30pm

Irving Finkel (British Museum), An Old Babylonian Lament with Instruments

Free of charge. Open to the public. No advance booking required.

 

Past Seminars:

Wednesday 9 March (Senate House, Room G35), 5 – 6 30pm

Richard Dumbrill, What do we know about Babylonian Music and how do we know it?

Wednesday 16 March (Senate House, Room G32), 5 – 6.30pm

Bruno de Florence, The epistemological framework of musicology: Aristotle, Descartes, Lacan (to be continued 8 June))

 

Wednesday 23 March (Senate House, Room G32), 5 – 6.30pm

Richard Dumbrill, The psychogenesis of theorism in Ancient Near and Middle-Eastern cultures

Wednesday 8 June (Senate House, Room 104)

Bruno de Florence, The epistemological framework of musicology: Aristotle, Descartes, Lacan (Continued from 16 March) 5 – 6.30pm

Wednesday 15 June, (Senate House, Room 103) 17.00 to 18.30

Richard Dumbrill, The reconstruction and Replication of the Silver Lyre of Ur.

Wednesday 22 June, (Stewart House, Room STB7) 17.00 to 18.30

Richard Dumbrill, The translation of Hurrian text H.6, the Oldest written music.

 

Free of charge. Open to the public. No advance booking required.